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File: 146682676837.jpg (300.09 KB, 3200x1956, image.jpg)

 No.4246

How does [chill] feel about the Brexit?

 No.4247

Countdown to europe's descent into war

 No.4248

Probably not good for Ireland
Don't know about Britain

Seems to me like there was too much Trump about the reasons for voting yes
"If we don't vote yes we're pussies, let's do something rash and just see what happens"
Maybe it'll work maybe not, my opinion is nobody knows, Britain have literally chosen the economic shit shoot. There's more science to tarot cards.

Also, does this mean I need a visa to cross the border in the North? I don't know, I wish you luck Britain, but I'm not sure I would have voted to leave if it had been my choice.

 No.4250

bad for everyone, but worst of all for the uneducated, unskilled types who voted for it

 No.4251

>>4250
and I know that's not overly polite, but to me this is nothing less than arson on the international system set up after ww2. Scotland, stay with us.

 No.4252

>>4251
I think for a lot of the educated people who voted to leave that was exactly the point. Obviously you have the far righters and etc, and an uneducated portion of the vote. But the uneducated can be swayed by fear in either direction, and they tend to vote less than more educated portions of the vote. from what I understand of it there was a lot of older people voting a) out of a want to return to the unity of pre-EU Britain and all the patriotism and xenophobia that that implies, and b) purely out of xenophobia and anti-immigration sentiments.

on the other hand, the result may be a united Ireland and an independent Scotland (NI is not a viable stand-alone state). Nationally, this may have plus sides, but probably not for Britain, and living near the economic fallout radius of this you'd have to be stupid not to have fears for the possibility of oncoming recession. Overall, I'm not too worried about the EU: as an institution it's fine I suppose and European community (in contrast) is great, but I don't think we ought to have any sentimental feelings that aren't purely practical (economic, freedom of movement, arguably legal benefits).

 No.4253

>>4252
That's totally correct, being emotional about the past (even the parts of the past that were actually good, and were about building a better world) leads to bad decisions like this one. I suppose if they could have articulated more positive, futuristic, reasons for remaining to the leave voters who haven't benefited as much from globalization, it might have gone a different way.

 No.4255

Remain should've won imo.

 No.4256

>>4253
>who haven't benefited as much from globalisation
But that's the whole thing, it's the people who have already benefited who voted no. People who benefited from the freedom of movement under the Schengen agreement, and the trade benefits through the late 70s, 80s, 90, 00s, up to now being middle-aged or older are the ones who were voting no. I know the younger voter isn't necessarily smarter, but that applies across the board and only slightly correlates to experience - either way the division outside of Scotland seems to have been mostly that the younger voters voted remain, the older voters leave. Younger people are also less likely to vote.

But otherwise I agree with you, the ironic thing about the leave campaign is that the strongest factor it has created is actually dissonance. The stupidity of traditionalists knows no limits. How people think that patriotism equates to introducing and enforcing their confused, often violent and oppressive opinions and traditions from 'the good old days' counts towards national unity is genuinely beyond me.


There's a lot of fear mongering about the build up to a new World War, and to be honest if things keep on going in this direction maybe it's a real threat. There's something in the air anyway.

 No.4257

File: 146701157020.png (154.14 KB, 500x1003, what-is-going-on-here-brex….png)


 No.4258

Shitty. There's still a chance that it won't go through though.

 No.4259

>>4258
Really? How?

 No.4262

File: 146718490398.jpg (22.79 KB, 360x300, Boris.jpg)

>>4259
A few reasons. Some of them are only valid for Scotland though.

In order to actually leave the EU, parliament has to enact article 50 of the Lisbon treaty, after which we have a maximum of 2 years to negotiate our departure. The referendum was not legally binding, and so did not automatically trigger this article.
David Cameron has stepped down as Prime Minister, meaning that the Tories need to elect a new leader. It will be up to this new leader to start the process of leaving the EU. However, there are a lot of pro-EU MPs within the Tory party, and there is nothing to stop them from standing for leadership.
If a pro-remain leader is elected, then they may refuse to trigger article 50 on the grounds that: 1 - it wasn't a legally binding referendum, 2 - 51.2% is barely a majority, and 3 - A lot of people who voted to leave did so because they're either xenophobic or because they fell for a proven lie that was written on the side of a bus.
In order to actually trigger article 50, I'm pretty sure that parliament would have to vote to do so. MPs are likely to vote against it for the above reasons.

Now we come to Scotland, where the majority voted to remain in the EU.
The Scottish parliament are adamant that Scotland will stay in the EU and are doing everything they can to stop us from being dragged out. There are 3 ways in which this can go: 1 - Scotland vetoes the referendum (this has been mentioned, but is very unlikely), 2 - England & Wales leave the EU, but Scotland, Northern Ireland & Gibraltar stay (this will likely be based on how Denmark owns both Greenland & the Faeroe Islands, neither of which are EU members), and 3 - A new Scottish independence referendum will take Scotland out of the UK & we will rejoin the EU.

 No.4263

>>4262
Fucking hell. I mean even if the MPs vote against it it's going to cause a shit storm.

 No.4264


 No.4265

>>4263
Yes it will. The UK is fucked either way.

 No.4267

>tfw you overhear coworkers planning summer vacations and they say "its just not safe to travel to france anymore"

 No.4272

>>4267
this everyday. fucking people like that are unsafe

 No.4289

[insert edited picture of Theresa May throwing England in the garbage with semi transparent picture of Penn Gillette smiling overlaid here]

[insert less lazy poster here]

 No.4293

Respects to the dead in Nice this weekend. For some reason, this is the first terrorist attack that has made me feel the threat very strongly in a real sense. Probably because it is coupled with the uncertainty of unity in Europe and the US right now, and the systematic yet disordered senselessness of the attack.

While it would be impossible to argue that we don't bear some responsibility for the current conflict and loss of life through the actions of the west in the middle east, two wrongs do not make a right. May the souls of the deceased rest in peace and may their bodies be recovered and returned to their families, and may there be an end to the violence in east and west alike.


May these deaths serve to remind us of the peace and prosperity that European unity and the progressive politics of the last 70 years have brought us, and may all of the Europeans on this board be safe as the crisis progresses.

 No.4768

File: 1487980196588.jpg (29.79 KB, 620x413, Win-a-pint-with-Nigel-Fara….jpg)

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